Invitation to Contribute to a Themed Issue on “Big Data and its Application to Public Health Decision Making”

Invitation to Contribute to a Themed Issue on “Big Data and its Application to Public Health Decision Making”

PharmacoEconomics announces a themed issue on big data analytics and its application to healthcare decision making, with a focus on health economics and outcomes research (HEOR).  The purpose of this themed issue is to showcase the application of big data analytics and HEOR concepts in healthcare decision making.  This issue will become a valuable source of innovative real-world applications of HEOR methods and big data analytics (including artificial intelligence and machine learning methods).

This Call for Papers arose out of the growing international demand for real-world evidence and increased use of HEOR concepts in healthcare decision making, together with sustained international interest in big data. The demand for real world evidence is being met by using HEOR tools and big data analytics. We seek to highlight these efforts. Thus, this Call for Papers invites applied papers that lie at the intersection of HEOR, big data analytics, and healthcare decision making. We welcome contributions from diverse international decision contexts including decision making for individuals at high risk for poor health outcomes, uninsured/low income/difficult-to-reach populations, or health disparity populations.

Given the purpose of this themed issue, we will consider only applied papers. It is important that the papers present a clear, accessible discussion that would engage researchers unfamiliar with the decision context.  Each submitted paper should accomplish the following objectives: 1) place the paper at the intersection of big data, HEOR, and healthcare decision making; 2) provide a well-balanced discussion of the real-world implications of their findings; 3) discuss how the paper supports the field of HEOR in harnessing the availability of big data.

Priority will be given to papers that illustrate the use of big data analytics and HEOR concepts in real-world decision making. We will consider papers in any of the following categories as they relate to decision making:

I.  Emerging Methods of Analysis
II.  Data Quality Issues
III.  Data Linkages
IV.  Health Information Technology
V.  Translating Evidence from Prior Studies

If you would like to contribute to one of these themes, please submit an abstract of up to 400 words by 31st May 2020 to chris.carswell@springer.com . Authors of selected abstracts will be notified by the end of June 2020 and asked to submit their final manuscript by 31st August 2020.

Eberechukwu Onukwugha

Guest Editor

Christopher Carswell

Editor in Chief

PharmacoEconomics

Call for Papers – PharmacoEconomics

Call for Papers – PharmacoEconomics

Economic Consequences of Major Depressive Disorder

PharmacoEconomics invites the submission of papers (original research, reviews, opinion and tutorial pieces) on the economic consequences of major depressive disorder (MDD) for a themed issue of the journal to be published in 2021 and guest edited by Paul Greenberg (Analysis Group). We encourage papers from the perspectives from a variety of stakeholders including payers, health technology assessment bodies, health economists, clinicians, pharmaceutical industry, policy makers, patients and caregivers, and advocacy groups. Special patient population perspectives (e.g. youth, comorbid populations, aged) and papers employing novel methods are particularly encouraged. Papers can be either methodological or applied.

Topics of interest include:

  • Epidemiologic estimates of MDD and its treatment
  • Economic and Humanistic Burden
    • Direct and indirect costs
    • Employment effects
    • Spillover effects
    • Quality of Life
  • Cost Effectiveness of Treatment
    • Models, trials or database analyses
  • Stated Preferences
    • Discrete choice experiments
    • Utility estimation
  • Methodological Challenges
    • Special patient populations
    • Impact of adherence
    • Modelling (treatment sequences, combination treatment, defining health states)
    • Challenges in conducting database analyses
    • Estimating workplace burden
    • Precision medicine
    • Placebo effects
    • Behavioural interventions
    • Treatment adverse effects
    • Distinguishing PRO and QALY data from data gathered using diagnostic instruments

Please submit an abstract describing your proposed paper by June 30th, 2020 to chris.carswell@springer.com. Full papers will be invited by July 31st 2020 and manuscripts due by November 30th 2020

Call for Papers – The Patient

Themed Issue – Patient and Public Involvement in
Health Economics Research (HEOR)

The disability movement first coined the phrase “Nothing about us without us” in the 1990s. Since then, the idea has widened and public and patient involvement (PPI) in health research has grown to be the norm.  Patients and the public are no longer merely subjects or recipients of health economics and outcomes research (HEOR), we are now engaging with them as active research partners and collaborators, including as co-investigators and co-authors. 

The Patient invites the submission of papers (original research, reviews and commentaries) on the role of patients and the general public in HEOR for a themed issue of the journal to be published in early 2020, guest edited by Paula Lorgelly (King’s College London).

We encourage papers that highlight innovative ways researchers have engaged patients and/or the public, projects that have trained patients/the public in order to increase their understanding of HEOR, and papers that have measured and quantified the value of patient/public engagement to their project. Country-specific perspectives are also encouraged particularly given that different funding bodies have varying requirements and standards regarding PPI. Papers can be either methodological or applied. Article types can be original research, thought pieces or reviews.

Topics of interest include:

  • Patients and the public as collaborators, including generating research questions
  • Patients and the public as trialists or modellers, i.e. designing methods
  • Training patients and the public to increase/improve their value to projects
  • Comparison of different engagement approaches, including PPI in HEOR projects vs other types of studies
  • Comparisons of projects involving patients versus those involving the public
  • Lay patients vs professional patients
  • The role of patient groups and/or research charities
  • PPI and conflicts of interest
  • Risks and benefits of greater PPI in HEOR

Note we are specifically interested in the role of patients and the public in HEOR; papers either on PPI in funding decisions (for research funding or technology adoption) or on outcome measures that are not preference based or use patient values  while of interest to the journal are outside of the scope of this themed issue.

Please submit an abstract describing your proposed paper by 31st August 2019 to chris.carswell@springer.com. Full papers will be invited by 30th September 2019 and manuscripts due early 2020.

Brexanolone (Zulresso™): First Global Approval – First approved therapy for postpartum depression

Brexanolone (Zulresso™): First Global Approval – First approved therapy for postpartum depression

In March 2019, the small molecule brexanolone was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of postpartum depression (PPD) in adult women.[1] Brexanolone, developed by Sage Therapeutics under a license from the University of California, was granted priority review status and breakthrough therapy designation by the FDA.[2][3] Continue reading “Brexanolone (Zulresso™): First Global Approval – First approved therapy for postpartum depression”

Roxadustat (Ai Rui Zhuo® in China): First Global Approval – First-in-class small molecule for anaemia in patients with DD-CKD

Roxadustat (Ai Rui Zhuo® in China): First Global Approval – First-in-class small molecule for anaemia in patients with DD-CKD

In December 2018, roxadustat, developed by FibroGen, in collaboration with Astellas and AstraZeneca, received its first global approval in China for the treatment of anaemia in patients with dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (DD-CKD).[1] Roxadustat is expected to launch in China in the second half of 2019.[2]

Continue reading “Roxadustat (Ai Rui Zhuo® in China): First Global Approval – First-in-class small molecule for anaemia in patients with DD-CKD”

Tagraxofusp (Elzonris™): First Global Approval – Breakthrough therapy for BPDCN and novel CD123-targeted therapy

Tagraxofusp (Elzonris™): First Global Approval – Breakthrough therapy for BPDCN and novel CD123-targeted therapy

The recent first global approval of tagraxofusp (Elzonris™) has been reviewed in detail in the First Global Approval report in Adis’ journal Drugs[1], based on the development milestones tracked in AdisInsight[2].

In December 2018, tagraxofusp, developed by Stemline Therapeutics, was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) in adults and children 2 years and older.[1][3] Continue reading “Tagraxofusp (Elzonris™): First Global Approval – Breakthrough therapy for BPDCN and novel CD123-targeted therapy”

Researchers investigate how vial sizes can be optimized to reduce pharmaceutical wastage

New study shows how drug manufacturers can reduce wastage, and therefore their costs, by altering the size of the vials they produce

Heidelberg | New York, 5 December 2018

AHEAPharmaceuticals are often dosed according to patient weight or body size which means that a dose must be individually measured. In a new study, lead author Anthony Hatswell of Delta Hat Limited and University College London in the UK, shows that by optimizing drug dose sizes available, wastage can be cut by as much as 50 per cent. The research is in the Adis journal Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, which is published by Springer Nature.

Many pharmaceuticals, such as drugs used for cancer treatment, are only available in standard quantities, for example in 100 milligram packages. In this study, Hatswell and his co-author Joshua Porter investigated how the quantity of medicine in each package could be varied to reduce the overall wastage. This would allow manufacturers to cut their costs, helping to make medicines available to patients.

To calculate the level of wastage, the authors looked at statistics from the Health Survey for England, which gives data on the height and weight of over 5000 individuals. Using this data they calculated how much drug would be wasted at every combination of vial sizes. The analysis was then tailored to the characteristics of patients with the disease (for example, males are heavier and taller than females on average), before the total wastage was aggregated over the population. By looking at all possible combinations of package sizes, Hatswell and Porter were then able to find those with low levels of wastage. The steps laid out in the publication can therefore be applied to any drug that does not  have a fixed dose.

The researchers found that wastage from the cancer drug pembrolizumab (Keytruda®, Merck, which is on track for sales of more than $5 billion in 2018) could be cut from 13.3 per cent to 8.7 per cent. Similarly the prostate cancer drug cabazitaxel (Jevtana®, Sanofi) could see wastage cut from a projected 19.4 per cent to 6.5 per cent.

“We use methods such as integer programming and operations research which date back to the Second World War and are widely used in the manufacturing of consumer goods. Their application to healthcare represents a novel step which ultimately we hope will help patients access important new medicines,” explains Hatswell.

Reference: Hatswell & Porter (2018). Reducing drug wastage in pharmaceuticals dosed by weight or body surface areas by optimising vial sizes, Applied Health Economics and Health Policy DOI: 10.1007/s40258-018-0444-0

 

The World Drug Safety Congress in Amsterdam addresses key challenges

The World Drug Safety Congress in Amsterdam addresses key challenges

Adis Pharmacovigilance attended the World Drug Safety Congress in Amsterdam on Sept 10th and 11th.

The event has been running for over a decade and is world renowned for its ability to connect key stakeholders in the drug safety field, as well as for leading the way in moving the sector forward.

Senior level drug safety professionals, as well as representatives from sponsors and service providers, met to discuss key topics and showcase solutions.

This year’s theme, Addressing Key Challenges for Safety Professionals, had us prepared for a series of interesting presentations and discussions on the ever growing importance of pharmacovigilance and the challenges connected with ensuring patient safety. Continue reading “The World Drug Safety Congress in Amsterdam addresses key challenges”

Avatrombopag (Doptelet®): First Global Approval – Reducing the bleeding risks of invasive procedures in patients with Chronic Liver Disease

Avatrombopag (Doptelet®): First Global Approval – Reducing the bleeding risks of invasive procedures in patients with Chronic Liver Disease

Avatrombopag (Doptelet ®) received its first global approval in the US; this was reviewed in detail in the First Global Approval report in Adis’ journal Drugs[1], based on the development milestones tracked in AdisInsight[2]. Continue reading “Avatrombopag (Doptelet®): First Global Approval – Reducing the bleeding risks of invasive procedures in patients with Chronic Liver Disease”

Erenumab (AIMOVIG™): First Global Approval in US followed by Positive CHMP Opinion – Once-monthly prophylactic approach for adults with Migraine

Erenumab (AIMOVIG™): First Global Approval in US followed by Positive CHMP Opinion – Once-monthly prophylactic approach for adults with Migraine

Erenumab (AIMOVIG™, erenumab-aooe) was launched in the US in July 2018, following its first global approval in the region in May, which was reviewed in detail in the First Global Approval report in Adis’ journal Drugs[1], based on the development milestones tracked in AdisInsight[2]. Also in May 2018, the agent received a positive opinion from the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP). Continue reading “Erenumab (AIMOVIG™): First Global Approval in US followed by Positive CHMP Opinion – Once-monthly prophylactic approach for adults with Migraine”