Call for Papers: Special Issue – The Economics of Mental Health

Call for Papers: Special Issue – The Economics of Mental Health

Applied Health Economics and Health Policy invites the submission of manuscripts with a focus on the economics of mental health for a special issue of the journal to be published in 2019.

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Estimates suggest that the annual cost of mental illness to developed countries is around 4% of GDP and results in around 12 million days of reduced productivity each year. To further our understanding of these issues, Applied Health Economics and Health Policy is calling for papers that explore the economic dimensions of mental health. Some key questions this work may consider include:

  • Are resources allocated efficiently in mental health?
  • What is the economic cost of mental illness?
  • What would be the return on investment of a scaled-up response to the burden of mental ill health?

The Guest Editors for the special issue are Professor Chris Doran and Dr Irina Kinchin from Central Queensland University, Australia.

Please submit an abstract describing your proposed paper by 30 September 2018 to the Editor, Tim Wrightson. Full papers will be invited by 31 October 2018 with manuscripts due in March 2019.

Call for papers: Special Issue – Family Spillover Effects of Illness

Call for papers: Special Issue – Family Spillover Effects of Illness

PharmacoEconomics invites the submission of manuscripts with a focus on family spillover effects of illness for a special issue of the journal to be published in 2018.

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The issue will focus on methods and applications for measuring spillover effects as well as conceptual papers discussing methodological and practical issues.

In a paper previously published in PharmacoEconomics, Guest Editors Eve Wittenberg and Lisa Prosser state:

Caring for an ill or disabled family member imposes a well-documented burden on the caregiver. The benefits of a health intervention may be underestimated if “spillover” effects on family members are not captured, resulting in inaccurate conclusions of economic evaluations.

For the context of this special issue, family spillover is defined as the effect on an individuals’ quality of life due to having a family member with a chronic illness. We consider spillover to include family caregivers as well as non-caregivers. Extensions to larger social networks may also be included with justification (e.g., classmates for children’s illnesses).

Topics of interest include:

  • Applications: Measurement of spillover for specific conditions or populations of interest, inclusion of spillover in cost-effectiveness analyses.
  • Methods: Conceptual frameworks, measurement tools or approaches, methodological or practical issues in measurement; challenges to application in CEA.

Please submit an abstract describing your proposed paper by July 31, 2017 to the Editor, Chris Carswell . Full papers will be invited by August 31, 2017 and manuscripts due in early 2018.